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PBS
Jul 14, 2012 2:00pm PDT
that it's a measure that doesn't harm most of us in california. >> i think that we together wonder if the public understand the research to teach at all of these. in order to do that they are going to have time to time and they are leading the charts to see if you can get it at san jose state. >> yes, it's a 1.5% in salary. we have not -- we're still talking about a contract. we have been doing that for 22 long months and finally after we 95% of us offered a strike, so we will see if there could be some compromise. it's been a hard time, yeah for all of us. >> is it fair to ask for an increase and at this time kuwait can you wait a little bit longer? >> we have not gotten that, so i think that we have waited long actually. i said that the work load has increased and everyone they know is dedicated and working hard to still assure that students are educated and is in addition we're concerned about critical thinking skills. we're working hard to make sure that occurs. >> if i represent the media, i think that sometimes we, the media "focus on the negative. one thing that i notice is how
PBS
Jul 20, 2012 12:00am PDT
government's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have h.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental proble
PBS
Jul 7, 2012 5:00am PDT
opposes disclosure laws because the super-rich just might be bullied and harassed by the rest of us who want to know who's buying our elections. so that the editorial page of "the wall street journal" asks us to have pity on billionaires and those little ol' corporations and their ceos who just might have their tender feelings hurt. if they were exposed to boycotts and pickets, were it known which candidates they were buying. wait a minute. weren't we taught the first amendment also guarantees the right of citizens to assemble and petition, even to boycott and picket? that's what a couple of hundred protesters were doing just the other day. they marched to the d.c. offices of american crossroads and crossroads gps. those are the right-wing money mills run by the mastermind of much of this massive fund-raising, karl rove. he's making a bundle himself buying and selling "free speech," while at the same time deploring the disclosure of big donors' names as "shameful" intimidation. exercising their first amendment rights, the demonstrators taped a kind of wanted poster on rove's office door
PBS
Jul 27, 2012 11:00pm PDT
for all of us to hear, but especially those of us who have never been in combat. karl marlantes, a small-town boy from oregon, the son of a soldier, a graduate of yale, landed in vietnam in october 1968, and was placed in charge of 1st platoon, charlie company, 1st battalion, 4th marine regiment. one year later he came home with two purple hearts, the navy cross, the bronze star, ten air medals, and memories that screamed at him. he finished his degree in philosophy at oxford on a rhodes scholarship and spent the next 30 years in business, all the while wrestling with the demons that came home with him. finally, in the late '90s, he asked the veterans administration for help, and began treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. two years ago he published a novel. he had been working on it ever since he came home from vietnam, "matterhorn," the story of a young 2nd lieutenant leading a rifle platoon of 40 marines on a remote jungle hill. critics called it "a powerhouse. tense, brutal honest," "unforgettable," "moving and intense." karl marlantes has now written a second book, a n
PBS
Jul 24, 2012 7:00pm PDT
publicly denouncing the 2003 invasion of iraq. in such books as "war is a force that gives us meaning," his weekly column for the website "truthdig" and freelance articles for a variety of other publications, chris hedges has taken his life's experience covering the brutality of combat and shaped a world view in which morality and faith, and the importance of truth-telling, dissent and social activism take precedence, even if it means going to jail. welcome, chris hedges. >> thank you. >> tell me about joe sacco. he was your companion on this trip. and he was your, in effect, co-author. although he was sketching instead of writing. >> i've known joe since the war in bosnia. we met when he was working on his book, "gorazde." and i was not a reader of graphic novels. but i watched him work. and i certainly know a brilliant journalist when i see one. and he is one of the most brilliant journalists i've ever met. he reports it out with such depth and integrity and power, and then he draws it out. and i realized that an extremely important component of this book was making visible these invisibl
PBS
Jul 6, 2012 12:00am PDT
. tonight, how politicians' use of social media can go awry. >> suarez: john merrow reports on a low income texas school district's approach to its drop-out crisis: a taste of college and hard work. >> so we're offering something that's more challenging to them, and telling them, "step up. you can have college now. it is free. it's your future. what do you want?" >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown talks to master storyteller jack hitt about his latest project and making his mark as a self- employed writer. >> the question i get every time i go see my mom and i still get it. she'll always ask me this question, "so when are you going to get a job?" and the answer is: "it's okay, mom. i'm never going to get a job. this is the job!" >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> growing up in arctic norway, everybody took fish oil to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost 30 years ago, i could not find an omega-3 fish oil that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of fish oil quality to the wo
PBS
Jul 2, 2012 6:30pm PDT
if the back half of this year which leaves us neutral on stocks for the back half of 2012. >> susie: and you're not including europe on that uncertainty list. do you feel that what happened at this european summit last week is setting europe on to a strong path or could they still muddle around? >> it does seem very much like europe will muddle around. i would say we were in a better position than 2 or 3 or four months ago. a lot of the smart clients i talked to feel strongly that germany looked into the abyss during the potential for a greek exit and decided they didn't like that picture very much so they will work larder to make the european situation stabilize in the back half of the year so while it's not off the table entire-- entirely it seems like europe is to the going to be as much of an issue as some of the u.s. discussion and tomorrowics outlined at the top. >> susie: it seems also, nick that a lot of investors are focusing more on the u.s. economy rather than what is going on in europe. today's manufacturing data that we just reported on, also we've got the jobs report c
PBS
Jul 25, 2012 11:30pm PDT
stf, so... the thousand pounds?! no, sara-- yocan use it to help t beand karen into agood state secondary. what, do you mn fotuition? no, no, you know. as a...donation. a bribe? wellisn't that how thin wor no! no, you haveo prend to be religis or lie about wre y live. ... and which are you gog too? ither! well, we did thinkbout the religion, but-- wellpetewas wrong. the rain's heloff. i said, "brenda, u should be as lucky ame. i've got the best ughter-in-law in the wld." ohlookt that. so wt can the queen do?can e tell her army tottacpeople? no. could she rn ptestants? noshe a protestant. n shsay who's on the rol vaety show? uh...no. wellthen that's unfair! what'she pnt in being queen youan't boss anybody abou well-- what would hpen the queen and e prime minister d a ght? well cotituonally, the prime-- no, nono, , no if there wasn acal fight beeen the queen anthe ime minister. i mean, she might old but she might beble to sti heringer in his onleye. what? i don'thingordon brown-- inome pictures, it looksike gordon brown's gottwoeyes. do thepainthe other one on? i thk if she's quee
PBS
Jul 19, 2012 6:30pm PDT
%. so, will that change in the rest of the year? joining us now to talk about the outlook for m&a, bob profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. >> bob, you were responsible for two mergers today, including that c p&g deal we just mentioned. do you see more deals picking up the rest of this year? >> it's actually a pretty good deal environment. the numbers are down year over year, but the first half of 20 len wa2011 was very active. and at&t and stx t mobile for example. this is an active market, but like the economy in general, it lacks some animal instinct. there aren't those huge headline grabbing deals that i frequently see. not a lot of home runs, but plenty of singles and doubles. >> susie: what would you say about the deals i mentioned? it seems more strategic in nature than the big transformational deals you just mentioned. >> they are. they're kind of asset redeployment deals. ppg and georgia gulf, for example, those are two chemical companies coming together. it's a complex structure. ppg spins its business off and merges into georgia gulf. engineered a
PBS
Jul 26, 2012 12:00am PDT
were distributed by the regime because it intends to use chemical weapons. >> reporter: some of the fighters here appear to have an islamist tinge. the man in the front seat adorns the black flag of al-qaeda. ( cheering ) and as locals welcome them with open arms, policy makers in the west will no doubt be concerned about where this is leading. by air the regime has launched a relentless counter attack using helicopters and rocks to tame rebellious districts. and more government tanks are on the way. the rebels have managed to seize some heavy artillery. and are using in whatever way they can. but a tank can't defend against these. a mig jet circles overhead. this conflict now appears to locked into a pattern of attack and counter attack on many different fronts. >> woodruff: a white house spokesman said today the use of heavy weapons in aleppo showed the, quote, "depth of depravity" by the government of bashar al- assad. for more on the conflict in syria we turn to youssef amrani, morocco's minister delegate for foreign affairs, the second highest ranking official in the ministry.
PBS
Jul 17, 2012 12:00am PDT
modern day dictators use to control protesters. they have really developed excellent crowd control techniques where they would move the crowds through with street cleaning equipment, cleaning the same street corner again and again and again. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama and governor mitt romney are broadening their critiques of one another as their nominating conventions approach, with a political battle now fully engaged over jobs, outsourcing, and taxes. >> the presidential candidate hammered away at each other today. each accusing the other of changing the subject.
PBS
Jul 14, 2012 5:00am PDT
to many of us for her long fight for an honest and accountable banking system. after years working on capitol hill, at the treasury department, the new york stock exchange and the commodity futures trading commission, she was appointed by president george w. bush to head the federal deposit insurance corporation, the fdic. now as senior advisor to the pew charitable trust, sheila bair has just organized a private group of financial experts called the systemic risk council. among its members, former fed chairman paul volcker, former senators bill bradley and alan simpson, john reed, once the chairman of citigroup, and brooksley born, the former cftc chairman who back in the 1990s accurately predicted an economic meltdown. its mission, to prevent the banking industry from scuttling the reforms created by the dodd-frank act, and, hopefully, prevent another crash. she has a book coming out in late september about the need for reform called "taking the bull by the horns." she's also written two books for children about money and entrepreneurship. "rock, brock and the savings shock" and
PBS
Jul 18, 2012 12:00am PDT
actions take the impetus off us to act responsibleally. i wish we had a chairman of the fed that sometimes would say look we're not doing anything now quit looking to us. are you tempted ever to say that to congress. would you not say that now? i don't think that's my responsibility. i've been assigned to do, to focus on maximum employment and price stability not to hold threats over congress' head. congress is in charge here not the federal reserve. >> in turn, democrat charles schumer of new york argued nothing will get through congress in this election year so the central bank must act. >> given the political realities, mr. chairman, particularly in this election year, i'm afraid the fed is the only game in town. i would urge you now more than ever to take whatever actions are warranted by the economic conditions regardless of the political pressure. >> to reach a deficit deal by january 1st to avoid automatic spending cuts and tax hikes. party leaders insisted today they won't let that happen. >> we're not going to let anybody's taxes go up at the end of the year. >> american
PBS
Jul 4, 2012 1:00am PDT
david walker would claim jefferson's argument had "injured us more, and has been as great a barrier to our emancipation as any thing that has ever been advanced against us," for it had " sunk deep into the hearts of millions of the whites, and never will be removed this side of eternity." so, the ideal of equality jefferson proclaimed, he also betrayed. he got it right when he wrote about "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." as the core of our human aspirations. but he lived it wrong, denying to others the rights he claimed for himself. and that's how jefferson came to embody the oldest and longest war of all -- the war between the self and the truth, between what we know and how we live. so enjoy the fireworks and flags, the barbecues and bargain sales. but hold this thought as well -- that behind this fourth of july holiday are human beings who were as flawed and conflicted as they were inspired. if they were to look upon us today they most likely would think as they did then, how much remains to be done. with those contradictions of american history in mind, this seemed a g
PBS
Jul 5, 2012 12:00am PDT
a different way, where the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewe
PBS
Jul 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
. >> it's important to communicate science because science is surrounding us. we swim in an ocean of science. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: power grids in the eastern u.s. struggled to rebuild today, even as new storms did new damage overnight. the death toll reached 22 killed in six states since friday, and for many thousands of others, there was only stifling heat and no air conditioning. for a third day, utility crews logged long hours to restore power to some two million customers. for a third day many endured long hours of misery after losing power in violent storms that struck fri
PBS
Jul 10, 2012 12:00am PDT
unemployment rate. >> ifill: when the president uses terms like stalemate to describe where congress is now -- we've used other words over the years, gridlock, you name it -- is he talking about philosophy or strictly about politics. >> about partisanship and politics. it's about defining the republicans as opposing any progress so that at the end of the day no matter what the job numbers show and the unemployment numbers show he can blame the republicans whether it's president bush or this congress and say they really haven't participated. they haven't helped me get this economy going. >> ifill: right under the surface, it seems or maybe not under the surface, right on the surface is this class war argument. he calls it a fairness argument. does that stick? is that what this was about today? >> i guess we're going to see whether it sticks. historically it hasn't stuck all that well. right now people seem focused on how is the president doing? how is the economy doing? are we getting jobs? the white house is trying to change the sub. it's a very reasonable strategy. i think it's a bit of an
PBS
Jul 28, 2012 12:00am PDT
, chief economist at moody's analytics. gentlemen thank you both it's good do have you with us. good to be here. >>. >> we have heard about what others said about these growth numbers what do yo do you think. >> i an i think it's distressint we went from a slow growth situation. there is a dark cloud on the hor rye when benbe benber knack ci confe yesterday he said it was stuck in the mud. that is not aut not a good plac. these are weak numbers. theeconomy is growing too slowly to bring down the unemployment rate. the unemployment rate is over 8% and it makes us vulnerable. there is lot of things that could go wrong. there are a lot of dark clouds. and we are still growing. >> so i hear you say we are growing. do you see something pose searchtive that i-- positive ths not obvious. >> the housing market is turning. and the housing downturn was ground zero for the problems and the catalyst for the great recession and a head wind for the economy. that has turned. and you can see it in the gdp up in. housing will be the source of growth in the future. the thing that is important the amer
PBS
Jul 5, 2012 5:30am PDT
got a bit of a wait. mommy's just working out where we check the bags in, and then that leaves us free to explore. ( man speaking on pa ) daddy, what's that man keep saying? oh, he's just telling us not to leave our bags unattended. now then-- but why does he keep saying it? well, because the airport people, you see, they don't want people just to wander off and leave their bags. that's why he's saying it. why? because there are some bad people who... very tiny, tiny, tiny number of--of bad people who might want to... damage the planes. what, like graffiti? no, a bit worse than that. anyway, who wants an ice cream? me, but what's that got to do with bags? because that's where they hide their bombs. bombs?! the bad people have bombs?! we are talking about a fantastically tiny number of bad people. the world is full of nice people. anyway, it's nothing to worry-- oh, look! look at that policeman with the dog. what kind of dog is that, do you think? why does he bring his dog to work? to sniff out the-- companionship. well, guess what? check-in isn't even open yet. you all right, kare
PBS
Jul 6, 2012 6:30pm PDT
: when the economy creates 80,000 jobs in one month, it's good enough to keep us from another recession. but, it's not good enough to chip away at that pesky unemployment rate. in the first quarter of this year, employers added an average of 225,000 jobs. but, in the second quarter the average downshifted to a disappointing 75,000. some economists credit warm winter weather for the early boost in hiring, saying it robbed jobs from the spring. but, no matter how you slice it, the economy is slowing and businesses are afraid to commit to new workers. >> the debt crisis in europe has the potential to dip the economy back into recession, although that's unlikely, it's probably a concern for businesses. and, secondly we have a lot of uncertainty related to tax policy and fiscal issues this year. >> reporter: today's weak data sparked new debate about what more the federal reserve can do to help. to some, a new round of bond buying, known as q.e.-3, looks like a strong possibility. >> it has to put quantitative easing othe table and has to be a viable option for the federal reserve. did this
PBS
Jul 5, 2012 6:30pm PDT
the market lower reminds us everything is really about what's happening in europe. we've got to remember the issue in europe is not that interest rates were too high, they're near zero as it is. the structure of issues are really more about bank integration, fiscal integration and political integration we think that's going to take a longer time to actually happen. >> actually to that point, a lot of the reaction today by analysts and economists was that we know we already have low interest rates and it's not doing much for growth and they were expecting for something more creative or more imaginative to become policy makers. what are your thoughts on that andres? >> well, i think it's okay to save some bullets in case others things develop in europe. it was prudent to just lower interest rates for now, and i think the market was expecting for more because that's what we've gotten in the past. having said that i don't think it was the wrong move to lower interest rates this time around. >> joel, do you think this will spur the fed to shift its thinking? >> not necessarily. the f
PBS
Jul 7, 2012 12:00am PDT
: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: for the third straight month, job growth fell short of expectations, calling into question what can be done to jumpstart the economy. the weak numbers were yet another sign the recovery may be stalling. employers added just 80,000 jobs in june, below the 90,000 to 100,000 economists had predicted. that leaves the three-month average at just 75,000 jobs per month, a third the pace of this year's first quarter. the unemployment rate remains unchanged at 8.2%. this morning, mitt romney took a break from his vacation in wolfeboro, new hampshire, tototo president obama has had his chance. >> in the case of president obama, this is not a monthly s
PBS
Jul 12, 2012 6:30pm PDT
web giant's turnaround plan. joining us now, scott kessler, senior equity analyst at s&p capital i.q. you know, scott, this company is one thing or another. you say that things are stabilizing at yahoo. tell us why. >> we think so, susie. if you think of the last year, the company has had i think four ceos. it's really astounding. and actually haven't decided on a permanent ceo. the krntd acting ceo is ross levinson has been in the company two years. we think the company would be best suited to put him in that chair. we think he has brought a lot of the stability that you refer to to the company. he has a steady hand. he has experience, and he's well likeed and respected across the industry. in addition, they've done a number of content partnerships as of late, and announced that they're actually moving forward on selling part of a stake in the chinese internet conglomerate. >> susie: you know, since you brought up the subject of management and ross levinson. put up a graphic to remind everybody how many ceos they've had going back to terry simmel, and then the founder jerry wang who
PBS
Jul 23, 2012 6:30pm PDT
: i'm tom hudson, "n.b.r."'s diane eastabrook joins us to talk mcdonald's; from earnings to europe and rising food costs, the outlook for the fast-food giant. >> susie: and we kick off a week long look at cyber security, focusing on the big business of protecting you online. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: stock markets around the world staged a sharp sell off today, led by losses in europe. fears continue building that spain might need a full-scale bailout. here in the u.s., stocks sold off early, but pared back the losses by the closing bell. the dow tumbled 101 points, it had been down, as much as, 240 points earlier in the session. the nasdaq lost 35, the s&p was down 12 points. erika miller reports spain's troubles now include the country's regional governments. >> reporter: valencia, spain has long been known for two things-- paella and its large port. but lately spain's third largest city has garnered unwanted attention as the first spanish region to seek a bailout. six others are in danger of following suit. >> it's worrisome, in the sense if they start t
PBS
Jul 11, 2012 11:00pm PDT
-what, just the two of you? oh, no, there's a whole gang of us. we'll be back by 10:30, and it's not a school day tomorrow, so it's fine. 10:30, jake? you're only 12. well, jo's got the tickets already, and everyone else's parents have said yes. have your parents said yes. absolutely. they'll be cool. "they'll be cool"? can i hang up now? yeah. there's a stupid man who keeps asking me questions. oh, give it to me. i promise i'll be back by 10:30. hang on, hang on. is it the cineplex you're planning to go to? i'm sorry you've had to wait for someone to answer. i've had to wait 71 minutes! there's a big group of us. what are you so worried about? let me see. there was the drive-by shooting that happened there last week. that was outside. karen: he's right. yes, but to get to the inside, you have to go through the outside. well, how come everyone else's parents think it's fine. yes, how come? karen, can you stay out of this, please? if that sentence is going to end "transfer you to another department," please don't say it because i will stab myself. ( indistinct response ) no, not you. it
PBS
Jul 19, 2012 12:00am PDT
crossed a tipping point today. i don't think the attack is the only indicator that tells us we've crossed that point. i think we see it in some other indicators as well. but this was by far the most visible. in addition, we've seen escalating violence in damascus. you have helicopter gun ships hovering right over the center of the city and that tells them that the regime is now on the defensive. >> woodruff: frederic wehrey do you think this is a tipping point. >> totally not. there are some totals of the defections we've seen, the increasing capabilities of the rebels along with the psychological blow on this attack. i think we've crossed a threshold. the regime still has a number of cars to play. it has capable units, the republican guard which controls damascus, these games of paramilitaries. i think what could result is this could really entrenched on the ally supporters. they could dig in and unleash greater violence. >> woodruff: what do you mean by that. because they have much more strernghts military strength than what we've seen so far. >> it's the most capable unit the r
PBS
Jul 13, 2012 6:30pm PDT
analyst fred cannon tells us why he's still recommending j.p. morgan stock and what to expect in the second half of the year. >> susie: and you may be one of millions of americans getting a health care rebate. we'll tell you why. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" >> tom: j.p. morgan's trading mess lost much more money than first thought-- nearly $6 billion. that's almost triple the original estimate. still, the nation's biggest bank still managed to post a $5 billion profit in the second quarter. including items, earnings per share were $1.21, while down from a year ago, that's well above wall street estimates. suzanne pratt has the story. >> reporter: j.p. morgan had so much news to explain to wall street it held a two-hour analysts meeting here at company headquarters today after it released its earnings report. here's what c.e.o. jamie dimon had to say about the bank's big blunder. >> we are not proud of this moment, but we are proud of our company. we are not making light of this error, but we do think this it's an isolated event. one of the reasons you do hold capit
PBS
Jul 21, 2012 12:00am PDT
recent story about smart meters used to monitor energy use. spencer michels reports on california activists who want to ban them. >> pacific gas & electric one of the nation's largest utilities has had to fight a coalition of people who suspect, among other things, that smart meters may be bad for your health. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: once again today, americans absorbed the news of a mass shooting-- a dozen dead, at least 59 hurt or wounded. it happened in the city of aurora, just east of denver, where a movie theater erupted in
PBS
Jul 24, 2012 12:00am PDT
by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the world got a look today at the man who allegedly gunned down scores of people in aurora, colorado, on friday. he appeared at his initial court hearing as police pieced together what led up to the assault in a movie theater. >> please be seatedded. ifill: it was the first time he had been seen publicly since friday's shootings, and james holmes cut a bizarre figure. his hair dyed bright orange, his eyes dazed. it was unclear if he was on medication, but the 24-year-old staredded blankly or not at all... or nodded off. and he never spoke as the judge explained the murder charges against him. afterward district attorney carol chambers said the state is co
PBS
Jul 5, 2012 5:00am PDT
say "jesus"! well, don't use my-- me-- as a trampoline. no, no, ben. go to your own bed. go on. you can't lie in bed all morning. it's 25 past six! can't you go downstairs and play a game or something? i'm hungry. well, go and get breakfast. okay, i'll make some omelets. no! no! why? the last time you made omelets, you left the kitchen floor like a sort of... eggie skating rink. well, you can't make an omelet without breaking eggs. no, that is true, but-- just don't make omelets, right? dad is gonna cook you something when he gets up. okay. i'll finish my experiment. oh, i don't like the sound of that. daddy, why did your friend jonty die? well... he, uh... he had a heart attack, sweetheart. did he know it was going to happen? well, no. i expect it was a bit of a surprise. did his heart explode? well, kind of... but not really, no. did blood come out of his mouth? did he go... rrraaaaaggghhh? did he go like... ( ghastly gasping ) ( thud ) who wants to watch telly? me! both: yay! ( loud, running footfalls ) well, maybe we should be getting up. eh? well, it seems daft, just lying arou
PBS
Jul 26, 2012 6:30pm PDT
in just one year. facebook's biggest challenge is figuring out how to adapt to the growing use of mobile technology. nearly all of facebook's revenues come from advertising, and that's more difficult with smaller screens. that's part of the reason facebook shares have gotten crushed-- they're down nearly 30% from the offering price of $38 in may. but some analysts still think the stock's a "buy." >> i think making money on facebook ultimately comes down to their ability to monetize mobile. it's almost binary. if they figure out a way to make money, the stock will be very successful; if they don't, then the stock will underperform the market. >> reporter: for now, many investors remain skeptical. when facebook went public, it had a valuation of $100 billion. now, it's closer to $60 billion. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> reporter: i'm diane eastabrook. still ahead--i'll tell you how the weber company is still keeping the grilling industry on fire after 60 years. "nightly business report" is brought to you by: captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: "whatever it takes to preserve the
PBS
Jul 25, 2012 11:00pm PDT
. ( car alarm blaring ) ben! pajamas and teeth! yeah? and, please, can you just use toothpaste this time! do you know, i could strangle him. although, according to their records, i've probably already tried that. there is a bear in the microwave. yeah, it's like a hot water bottle. it's full of grain. karen's feeling poorly. well, that's probably a case of "my brother's getting more attention than me" -itis. jake: oh, mum? granddad called. oh, did he? how's he doing? yeah, he's fine. he says he really likes the home, but next time you go, could you bring him a panasonic remote. a remote? ( microwave beeps ) yeah, he says it'll give him dominance in the tv room. i'm feeling sick, you know! you'd better go to bed, then. why has she got hot bear? i'm the one that's ill! i've been in hospital. they said you were fine. i was not fine. i had bruises and a pattern of unexplained injuries. they are not unexplained injuries! all you've got is a few little bruises on your arm. well, i'm ill, so i should get hot bear. i'm iller. i'm iller. ( slap ) hey, hey, stop it. oh, no. if you were both s
PBS
Jul 25, 2012 6:30pm PDT
delta and us airways had better growth than anticipated. due like any of these? >> it wasn't growth in size. it was growth in earnings. they come across strong, and expecting the same for the third quarter. post labor day, i'm a little more nervous. i'm looking for one or two percent economic growth in the u.s., and i'm nervous about the tax cut in january. >> and we'll have a good quarter for carriers. >> tom: is us airways going to buy american airlines in the next 12 months? >> i think the probability of that happening nlt next year is 90% to less than 50/50. american wants to go it alone, and they expressed that. it might not be exclusive right. >> tom: a big change in that consolidation. >> and you mentioned the discount space. we've seen better bottom lines than anticipated in the likes of southwest airlines, spirit and hawaiian airlines. >> smaller carriers, different business model. anything to change with the headwinds out there? >> i don't count south southwest because they're not growing right now. but the niche carriers in special iepzed area, alaska airlines, spirit, alleg
PBS
Jul 24, 2012 6:30pm PDT
. >> susie: those disappointing apple earnings could set the tone for trading tomorrow. joining us now to talk more about apple, joe mayer, technology analyst at motley fool. joe, you heard our report, a lot people, a lot analysts are saying that apple should get a pass this time because so many customers are waiting for that iphone 5. so is that fair? what do you say to that? >> i had a feeling you were going to hear that from apple, that there was going to be a miss. there probably is something to that and something to a larger issue with europe and china, both results there were weak across the board and they were okay in the u.s.. but i think it's pretty predictable that some people will put off buying the new iphone because there's going to be a newer, faster thinner one coming out, but at the same time that's a little bit of passing the buck. there's been a lot good material coming out from other manufacturers and there's been a lot of good competition while apple hasn't brought much to market in the past couple quarters. >> susie: so who is nibbling at apples angles? >> i think sam
PBS
Jul 13, 2012 12:00am PDT
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: penn state got the full story today on a football coach's sexual abuse of boys and the subsequent actions by officials and it was a damning one. the review ran 267 pages and followed an eight-month investigation. ray suarez begins our coverage. >> our most saddening and sobering finding is the total disregard for the safety and welfare of sandusky's child victims by the most senior leaders at penn state. >> suarez: former f.b.i. director louis freeh minced no words today. he charged there was a conspiracy of silence among top leaders at penn state about claims that jerry sandusky preyed on young boys. last month, the former assistant
PBS
Jul 9, 2012 6:30pm PDT
forecast out of europe, out of china, even out of the u.s. so fell us where you see the demand. >> well, we expect 7% demand goals this year. we also expect that the-- we see a very strong regional premium which show there is a tight innocence the market. where is that coming from? it's coming from aerospace. we have aerospace market these days with eight years of order backlog that's very substantial. and it's going toa while. we also see surprises here in the u.s., particularly coming from the automotive industry. and that's doubly positive for the aluminum industry because on the one hand we have seen so far in this year a 15% growth in automotive demand here in the u.s., very nice. in addition to that, we see that the amount of aluminum used in cars is going up. because lightweighting is the name of the game. emissions are coming down. consumers want to spend less money on their fuel and that's why they are going for. an on top of it there are new emissions regulations there, so this is all coming together. these are some of the right spots. >> susie: well, certainly you have been g
PBS
Jul 31, 2012 12:00am PDT
: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: colorado prosecutors formally charged james holmes today with 24 counts of first degree murder in one of the deadliest mass killings ever. there were two charges for each of the 12 people killed in the movie theater in aurora. and the 24-year-old also faces two counts of attempted murder for each of the 58 injured. the murder charges carry a maximum penalty of death and a minimum of life without parole. peter banda of the associated press was in the courtroom today. i spoke with him a short time ago. they're charging them under two different near owes. murder after deliberation. a second one first degree murder extreme indifference. on the other counts, there's 1
PBS
Jul 25, 2012 12:00am PDT
report from damascus on the aftermath of fierce fighting, as government forces use helicopter gunships and heavy artillery to pound the rebels. >> woodruff: and in a second election story, ray suarez reports on a voting rights showdown in a battleground state. >> a court here will be asked to decide whether pennsylvania can run next november's elections with one of the toughest voter i.d. laws in the country still in place. >> ifill: i sat down with sir elton john to talk about his new book and his determination to put an end to the aids crisis. >> i feel strong enough and lucky enough to open up and say "i'm h.i.v.-positive" then we're facing an uphill battle. >> woodruff: and we talk with miles o'brien about the lasting legacy of the first american woman to enter space, astronaut sally ride. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, produc
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